Spanish Cinema In The 60s
Image Source: Google Image

Spanish Cinema In The 60s

Today, as virtually every Thursday, we will talk about the Spanish cinema of the 60s and continue walking through the history of cinema in our country. We discuss their most fundamental features of its most prominent directors and the most important films of this period, in addition to present some of his scenes.

Spanish Cinema In The 60s
Image Source: Google Image

The last week as I went along that both Juan Antonio Bardem and Luis Garcia Berlanga continue to have a major role in the Spanish cinema of the 60s . So today we are going to talk about some of the most outstanding films of both directors during this period , films that marked his subsequent films.

Regarding Juan Antonio Bardem , after his huge success achieved especially during the past decade, during the 60s also created films that stood out and left to see their primary characteristics. One was ” Never for Nothing ” (1963), the Spanish censorship film banned in cinemas in our country, remember that Bardem was one of the Spanish directors hardest hit state censorship. Another of the most outstanding films Bardem was ” The Piano Mechanics ” (1965). From this moment, Juan Antonio Bardem dedicated his professional life to make movies custom , for example, with the production of Chris Miller in 1972 and early democracy will move towards the political cinema with ” Seven Days in January “.

Spanish Cinema In The 60s
Image Source: Google Image

As for Luis Garcia Berlanga , we said that there was a before and after his film ” Placid ” (1961), from which would carry out another of his best known films: ” El Verdugo ” (1963). During this time, the film Berlanga be more ironic, more acidic although superficially be cheerful and comical. It will highlight the use of black humor making all kinds of references to death, to the city of provinces, fighting environment, lack of communication and interest in representing the equality of film time with real – time through the plane sequence.

During the decade of the 60s , they will emerge new groups divided between hope and failure, but will try to continue making a new film . One could speak in Madrid the new Spanish cinema and Barcelona of the School of Barcelona .

Spanish Cinema In The 60s
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All filmmakers will mostly young people trying to innovate and also have to represent Spain at international festivals. It is the period of José María García Escudero trying to expand the boundaries of tolerance from several reforms :

– New Censorship Act (1963). So far, everything depended on each censor and, at this time, each director will try to know what is considered objectionable and what not. Censorship still existed, but start the first openings of Spanish cinema.

– Established a standard for the development of Spanish cinema

– Birth of the control office

– The Institute for Research and cinematic experiences (QFII) obtained great aid by García Escudero and went on to become the Official Film School (EOC)

With these guidelines, Garcia Escudero meant the emergence of new cinemas and partly succeeded. In addition, trying to rationalize the market renewing the professional staff at different levels. In turn, subsidized films that could participate in international festivals, he made a dis unification the content of films by mitigating the effects of censorship and content becomes more important.

Let alone the so – called, Madrid focus . It surges in 1963 and debuting with him a number of filmmakers who came from the old QFII. Among them highlighted Manuel Summers , with ” The Girl in Mourning ” which was selected to participate in the Cannes Film Festival (1964), Juan García Atienza and Antonio Mercero . The following year, they joined this group Jose Luis Vorao, Miguel Picazo, Jaime Camino, Ramán Gubern and Vicente Aranda . The works of this new cinema are located in the gritty neorealism, the two most representative films ” Nine Letters to Berta ” of Basilio Martin Patino and ” Aunt Tula ” of Miguel Picazo .

In addition, there is at this time a fight against commercial cinema supported by filmmakers of dissent, especially by Juan Antonio Bardem, because they thought that this type of film blocked the promotion to production. This critical film were characterized as atypical and adpotar empermeabilizar and foreign narrative models. Other notable films of this Madrid focus were ” Fata Morgana ” by Vicente Aranda (1965), ” Diritambo ” of Gonzalo Suárez (1967), ” Nocturne 29 ” of Pere Portabella (1968) or ” The Hunt ” by Carlos Saura (1965) .

Let us focus on what was called the School of Barcelona . This group advocated a kind of underground cinema that was carried out with limited means and largely outside the channels following the Madrid focus. His films were experimental and sometimes incomprehensible. The greatest exponent of this film was Ricardo Muñoz Suay .

Spanish Cinema In The 60s
Image Source: Google Image

In the late 60s and early 70s he began to form the phenomenon called ” landismo ” which we mentioned at the last week, which was so named because the vast majority of movies were protagonists by Alfredo Landa ; and the ” Spaghetti Western ” in Almería. In turn, it takes place the emergence of other producers who try to modernize the Spanish cinema halfway between new cinema and a commercial film that could reach the public. One of the best examples was José Luis Dibildos . This film touched the reality of the moment but without treating the rawest issues. It sought naturalness, freshness, be close to the public, develop progressive ideas and sophistication.

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